About Me

Stewart was born in St. Louis, MO., and moved to Oakland, CA., at the age of five. Her parents and schoolteachers noticed Stewart’s natural artistic ability and encouraged her to pursue this passion. She continued to paint throughout her childhood, and with overwhelming support from her adult mentors, Stewart received a four-year scholarship to the San Francisco Art Academy after graduating from high school. In addition to the San Francisco Art Academy, she also attended Chabot College in Hayward, CA., and California State University where she majored in fine arts. She left school before graduation and did not paint again until 1990. In 1990, Stewart reentered the art world after encouragement from friend and neighbor Terry McMillian, who is a best-selling novelist. Utilizing African American themes within her paintings, Stewart began painting artwork that featured women dancing, praying, and performing everyday tasks. Combining her love for African American history and her own identity as an African American woman, Stewart’s art slowly gained momentum and popularity in art circles. Since 1990, Stewart has participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions. Her paintings Flow and Grandma’s Love have been featured on television shows, including Waiting to Exhale, Romeo Must Die, and Living Single. She has also drawn illustrations for California State Lottery and Bank of America calendars. One of Stewart’s most commercial paintings, Rhythm & Joy, has been reproduced for use in a line of family record books, journals, and photo albums. Other pieces of her artwork, including Draped in the Glow and Draped in the Moment, have graced the covers of popular novels. Stewart continues to create original artwork for a line of tapestries, puzzles, and needlepoint kits. While Stewarts main medium is oil paints, she also enjoys creating artwork with charcoal and chalk. Stewart’s goal as an artist is to create artwork that exhibits personal tribulations and experiences of the African American population. Her paintings feature mostly women subjects because she draws from personal experiences and interactions with her female relatives and friends.